So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

(Source: tfios-changed-my-life, via youngadultread)

"Male privilege is “I have a boyfriend” being the only thing that can actually stop someone from hitting on you because they respect another man more than they respect your rejection/lack of interest."

The Sociological Cinema

There was actually research that was done that found that women who used an “I have a boyfriend/husband” excuse to reject unwanted sexual attention and harassment by their bosses were more likely to be left alone than those who used any other excuse (including “I’m not interested”)

Because men respect another man’s property (and that’s how they see us) than a woman’s autonomy.

(via stanhowse)

Always reblog this.

(via miel-lapin)

(Source: queerintersectional, via youngadultread)

Anonymous: I was wondering if you had any type of information on age progression with children as how would a four year old act what type of characteristics would he or she have

writeworld:

We are not a child psychology blog (or else we’re a stupendously bad child psychology blog). It is with heavy hearts, therefore, that we must admit that we do not have many (any) in-house resources for the developmental stages of tiny humans. We do, however, have links! 

I highly recommend the book The Writer’s Guide to Character Traits: Includes Profiles of Human Behaviors and Personality Types by Linda N. Edelstein for basic profiles of children in various social and psychological situations from the need-to-know perspective of a writer. 

Other than that, here are some resources for writing four(ish) year olds:

And here are some general resources on writing children:

Also, I bet there are some parents out there on Tumblr who may be willing resources for you, anon. If you’d like to be a resource for this anon on four year olds, please reply to this post. Please do not send us a message with your interest. (It’s much easier for us and for the anon and for everyone, really, if you just reply directly to the post.)

If anyone else has any resources they think would go nicely with this list, please send them along!

Thank you for… wondering…! 

-C

hoaxsuicide:

sherlock making john breakfast in bed every morning because he’s a little nervous baby and wants their relationship to be textbook perfect

(via imjohnlocked)